Category Archives: Gee Vaucher

Someday All The Adults Will Die

Someday All The Adults Will Die: Punk Graphics 1971-1984, curated by Johan Kugelberg and Jon Savage, provides a comprehensive overview of punk graphic design, highlighting imagery before, during and after the punk years, drawing upon previously unseen public and private archives and collections.

Punk and post-punk graphic design is illuminated by examples of homemade cassettes, fanzines, posters, handbills, records and clothing.

Highlights include original artworks by Gee Vaucher, Jamie Reid, Gary Panter, John Holmstrom and Penny Rimbaud alongside numerous anonymous artists.

The exhibition coincides with the publication of Punk: An Aesthetic by Johan Kugelberg and Jon Savage, published by Rizzoli.

September 13 – November 4, 2012
Hayward Gallery, London

Consummatum Est

Now that all six of the original Crass albums have been reissued on CD for the Crassical Collection, we are able to fit together the pieces of the puzzle that make up the Crass symbol from the covers.

The symbol is from a photographer of one of Crass drummer Penny Rimbaud’s old bass drum heads.

And if you like, you can also hang it on your wall, by way of a poster designed by the band’s artist Gee Vaucher.

We’d like to thank Crass fan Alan Jones for suggesting it!

Available for pre-order now in the Southern shop.

Thanks.

Exitstencilisms presents Acts Of Love

“Everything that we write is a love song.” – Crass,Yes Sir, I Will

Recorded towards the end of Crass’ seven year social bombardment and previously released in 1985 on vinyl, Acts of Love was Penny Rimbaud’s ‘other voice’. Fifty poems written from 1968 to 1973, set to music – classical, jazz and avant garde – composed by Rimbaud and performed by Eve Libertine.

Penny Rimbaud: “Throughout the late Sixties and early Seventies, I had worked on a series of fifty poems entitled Acts Of Love, an expression of the existential/zen hybrid which to this day remains the core of my philosophical musings. The poems laid out a raison d’être far from the political, psychological and social complexities which later began to engulf me. To counter what had become the darkness of Crass, I felt compelled to return to those poems as a source of light, and further, to make them public. I wanted to the work to be a celebration of the communality of beauty, of a shared purpose within creativity. I was looking for a confirmation of unity, a reclamation of the great romantic tradition, an act of unconditional love.”

Gee Vaucher: “For me, Acts Of Love was the starting point anyway – the poems and the original illustrations were done a long time before Crass.They were part of the inspiration, part of the source of going on to say what we did. For me, it’s a return to those roots – not going backwards, but the source of inspiration within oneself. It’s a very natural extension of what we’ve done with Crass. What we tried to do is remind people of why they were putting themselves in a very dangerous position socially and personally, by making a beautiful record really.”

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